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Action Alerts

MNPS members receive notices of pending legislation or where letter writing or phone calls to elected officials are required.

Other organizations have good mailing lists also. Below are links to a few organizations' web pages where you can find information on subscribing to these e-mail lists.

You can also attend events such as open houses for planning and zoning departments of state and local governments, and express your concerns. See State and Local Government Events.

  • 03/23/2015 9:13 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Ten Mile Creek is facing a big, new threat. In December, the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission (WSSC) unveiled a set of possible sewer options to provide service to the limited amount of development allowed in the Ten Mile Creek watershed. The problem is that all of these options involve putting sewer pipes and pump stations alongside and/or in the creek, its tributaries and the environmental buffer areas established by the Montgomery County Council last April! Yes, you read that right -- sewers and pump stations in the very areas that the Council designated as off-limits to development because protecting them is critical to maintaining the health of the creek and the quality of water it delivers to the reservoir. Clearly, this is unacceptable, and we thank everyone who has already contacted the Council and County Executive to express your concerns. We want to work with all stakeholders to find a way to provide sewer service without putting sewer infrastructure in the creek, tributaries, or established buffers. Working together, I'm confident we can find a solution, but we need your support. 

     

     

    Here's how you can help:

     

     

    1) Send an Email: Let WSSC, the Council, and County Executive Leggett know that the original sewer proposals are unacceptable and they need to undertake a thorough and transparent review of all possible environmentally-responsible sewer alternatives, and find a solution that keeps sewers and sewer infrastructure OUT of the creek, its tributaries, and its environmental buffer areas. 
    Send To:
    Please cc us at mail@tenmilecreek.org

     
    2) Attend a meeting of WSSC's Citizens Advisory Committee on the Ten Mile Creek Sewer Study next 
    Wednesday, March 25th from 7-9pm at the  Upcounty Regional Services Center, Room A (12900 Middlebrook Road, Suite 1000, Germantown, Maryland). These meetings are open to the public, and we urge you to attend and show your continued support for the creek and reservoir.  
     
     
    3)  Support Friends of Ten Mile CreekPlease consider joining us as a member, or, if you are already a member, making an additional contribution to support our on-going work to confront this new threat.
     
     
    4) Learn more in this  brilliant photo essay created by Friends of Ten Mile Creek Board member, Cathy Wiss.


    5) Email us (mail@tenmilecreek.org) if you know of an environmentally-minded sewer expert familiar with alternative sewer technologies (such as pressure sewers) who might be willing to advise 
    our organization.

     

     

    That's the cliff-notes version.  If you want to learn more, please keep reading below.  Thank you for your continuing support.  

     

     

     

    All the best,

     

    Tenley Elizabeth Wurglitz, President

    Friends of Ten Mile Creek & Little Seneca Reservoir 


     +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

     

    The Long Version - The Ten Mile Creek Sewer Issue In Detail

     

    Not quite one year ago, on April 1, 2014, we celebrated a victory that came after years of determined citizen activism.  On that day, the Montgomery County Council voted unanimously to protect the health of Ten Mile Creek by strictly limiting the amount of development allowed in its watershed. Specifically, the Council's decision - codified in the Ten Mile Creek Limited Master Plan Amendment - set science-based limits on the amount of impervious surface (roads, houses, parking lots, etc.) allowed in the watershed and it put certain areas of the watershed off-limits to development altogether. Buffer areas were established around the creek's mainstem, its tributaries, and other sensitive areas like wetlands, seeps, springs, and interior forest habitat.  Those protections were not arbitrary. After listening to and studying extensive testimony by leading scientists, the Council decided that protecting those areas is critical to protecting the health of the creek and the quality of water it delivers to Little Seneca Reservoir. That was last April. And each and every one of you contributed to that victory.

     

    Now, fast-forward to this past December. On December 17, 2014, WSSC unveiled a set of potential options for providing sewer service for the limited amount of development that the Council voted to allow in the Ten Mile Creek watershed.  To our collective shock, all five of WSSC's proposed options involve putting sewer pipes and pump stations alongside/in the creek's mainstem, its tributaries and through the environmental buffer areas established by the County Council last April.  In other words, sewers and pump stations would be built in the very areas we thought were protected by the Council's unanimous decision. It goes without saying that this would cause irreparable harm to the creek. (One of our Board members, Cathy Wiss, has created a photo essay detailing the short and long-term damage that could be expected should these plans be approved.) 

     

    Some have asked if this is a bad joke. Unfortunately, it's not. It means we have to continue fighting to protect areas we already thought - and were assured by elected officials - were protected.

     

    That's the bad news.  The good news is that TOGETHER we can do this and we are already making good progress.

    Thanks to the incredible deluge of emails and calls that you made over the past few months, we've put the Council and County Executive Leggett on notice that WSSC's original sewer proposals are unacceptable.  You raised your voices and the Council heard you loud and clear-people all across the region still care about Ten Mile Creek and we're not going to stand by and see our hard-won protections trashed. And that's important because the Council will ultimately have to approve or reject any sewer plan that WSSC puts forward. We need the Council to stand firm on their commitment to protect Ten Mile Creek. (See FoTMC Board member Scott Fosler's testimony to the Council in January )

     

    While we are making progress in raising the alarm about WSSC's proposed alternatives, we also understand that to successfully fend off this new challenge to the creek's health, we can't just say no -- we have to be part of the solution. To that end, Friends of Ten Mile Creek Board members have been busy meeting with Councilmembers, WSSC leadership, and others to explain why we need to push the restart button on this whole process. We are asking WSSC and Montgomery County to start over and undertake a thorough and transparent study of all possible alternatives that could be used to provide sewer service to the limited amount of development allowed in the watershed, while still -- and this is the critical bit -- meeting the County's commitment to give Ten Mile Creek the "extraordinary protection" it deserves.  In plain English, this means that we want to work with all stakeholders - local residents, developers and others, to find sewer alternatives that do not involve putting sewer pipes, pump stations, or other sewer-related infrastructure alongside or in the creek's mainstem, its tributaries or the environmental buffer areas established by the Council.

     

    We also want to help the long-suffering residents of Clarksburg's Historic District find a solution to their urgent need for sewer service. As many of you know, most of Clarksburg's Historic District (located within the Ten Mile Creek watershed) lacks public sewer service, a fact that has caused significant problems for its residents and businesses. We strongly support the Historic District's property owners in their quest to gain sewer connectivity - and we believe it's possible to provide sewer service to the Historic District without causing damage to Ten Mile Creek.  

     

    We're certainly not sewer experts and we don't pretend to be, but we are good researchers, and we know there are alternatives to the conventional, highly destructive gravity sewer options that WSSC has proposed.  One particularly promising alternative appears to be pressure sewer systems - a technology that WSSC has extensive experience with in Montgomery County (check out p. 17 of Cathy's photo essay ).  And who knows, there may be other wastewater collection technologies out there that we haven't even heard of yet. 

     

    Ten Mile Creek and Little Seneca Reservoir are regionally significant resources that have been deemed worthy of "extraordinary protection." Shouldn't that translate into a thorough, transparent, and dare we say, "extraordinary" search for all possible sewer alternatives that will provide that protection?

     

    We think so, and if you agree, here's how you can help:

     

    1) Learn more:

    One of our Board members (and Audubon Naturalist Society Water Quality Monitoring Program Coordinator), Cathy Wiss, has produced a brilliant photo essay detailing the short and long-term damage that would be caused by the sewer options that WSSC has proposed. There's also information about one potential alternative technology (pressure sewers) that may be a feasible way to provide sewer service to the watershed while still protecting the creek. Believe me, you're gonna be impressed!  

     

    2) Get inspired:

    created by two Poolesville High School students, Allie Goldman and Danielle Roche.  Enjoy and share with everyone you know! 

     

    3) Get Vocal: Email WSSC (communications@wsscwater.com), the County Council (county.council@montgomerycountymd.gov), and County Executive Isiah Leggett (ocemail@montgomerycountymd.gov). Please cc us at


    Let them know what you think of WSSC's original proposals and tell them we need to find a way to provide sewer service while still protecting the creek.  That means that WSSC needs to do a thorough and transparent study of all possible environmentally-responsible sewer alternatives, and find a solution that keeps sewers and sewer infrastructure OUT of the creek, its tributaries, and its environmental buffer areas. (Even if you've already emailed the Council, I'm sure they'd love to hear from you again!) 

     

    4) Stand With Us: WSSC has convened a Citizens Advisory Committee to provide public input on the Ten Mile Creek sewer study.  The Committee is composed of local residents, developers, and three of our Board members - Cathy Wiss, Anne James, and Jay Cinque.  The committee's first meeting was in February and the second meeting will be held on Wednesday, March 25th from 7-9pm at the Montgomery County Government's Upcounty Regional Services Center, Room A (12900 Middlebrook Road, Suite 1000, Germantown, Maryland). These meetings are open to the public, and we urge you to attend and show your support for keeping sewers and sewage out of the creek and reservoir. We need to show WSSC and County leaders that people from all across our region still care about Ten Mile Creek and we're not going to stand by while our hard-won protections are trashed by sewers. 

     

    5) Email us immediately if you know an environmentally-minded sewer expert: We are urgently trying to find an environmentally-minded sewer expert familiar with alternative sewer technologies (such as pressure sewers) to advise Friends of Ten Mile Creek. (We've managed to learn a lot about sewer technologies in the last few months, but we're certainly not experts.) We are pursuing some leads, but if you know someone who fits the bill, we'd love to hear from you. Please email

    mail@tenmilecreek.org if you have any recommendations.   

     

    6) Support Friends of Ten Mile Creek:

    Our fledgling organization is working hard to confront this new threat to the creek and we could use your financial assistance. As I mentioned, we are actively seeking a sewer expert to advise Friends of Ten Mile Creek and we may need to pay expenses, which could be significant. Please consider joining us as a member, or, if you are already a member, making an additional contribution to support our on-going work.   

     

     

    Thank you for staying with us in this effort to protect our last, best creek. Together, we won a highly protective plan last April and I'm confident we can confront this new challenge and succeed. And who knows, along the way, we may even find new methods to provide better protection to other area watersheds as well.

     

    All the best,

     

    Tenley Elizabeth Wurglitz, President

    Friends of Ten Mile Creek & Little Seneca Reservoir

  • 01/18/2015 10:08 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)
    Dear Supporter of Ten Mile Creek,    
     
    On December 17th, Friends of Ten Mile Creek Board Members, Cathy Wiss and Anne James attended a public meeting on a  WSSC/Montgomery County sewer study for the Clarksburg-Ten Mile Creek area.

     

    They were shocked to find out that all of the proposed sewer options involve laying sewer pipes in Ten Mile Creek and its stream valley, which would destroy creek habitat during the pipeline construction and leave Ten Mile Creek vulnerable to raw sewage leaks as the pipes age. This plan clearly violates the County and Leggett Administration's commitment to protect Ten Mile Creek.

     

    The Montgomery County Council is holding a public hearing on the WSSC/County sewer plan on Tuesday, January 20, 2015.  If we don't want our hard-won protections for Ten Mile Creek flushed, we must act now!

     

    All the alternatives in the WSSC/County sewer plan are unacceptable (see our fact sheet and letter to the County Council ). They must be replaced with a plan that provides sewer service without putting sewer pipes in Ten Mile Creek. Such alternatives do exist and have been used before in Montgomery County. 

     

    Email or call the County Council and County Executive Leggett today (see sample email below) and tell them don't flush Ten Mile Creek protections-scrap this plan and hit the restart button on this process. We need a plan that keeps sewers and sewerage out of Ten Mile Creek! 
     

    Thank you in advance for taking action to protect the creek from this new threat! 

                                ___________

       

    Send your email to County Council and County Executive Leggett: county.council@montgomerycountymd.gov,  

    ocemail@montgomerycountymd.gov 
    and please cc us at mail@tenmilecreek.org

     

    Sample email: 


    Dear County Executive Leggett and Councilmembers:

     

    The WSSC/Montgomery County Ten Mile Creek/Clarksburg Sewer Service Alternatives plan threatens the Ten Mile Creek watershed.

     

    All of the options presented in the WSSC/County study would do significant harm to Ten Mile Creek, its floodplain and its subwatersheds.  The plan is clearly not based on the commitment to protect Ten Mile Creek as established in the Limited Master Plan Amendment.

     

    The seemingly secretive, rushed and closed process that WSSC and the County have run to arrive at this sewer plan is equally troubling. As you know, Ten Mile Creek, our last, best creek and only clean, high-quality tributary to Little Seneca Reservoir is of regional significance.  We deserve a voice in its protection-that's good government.

     

    Please scrap the WSSC/County Ten Mile Creek/Clarksburg Sewer Service Alternatives plan and hit the restart button.  Let's work together to craft a sewer plan that keeps pipes and sewage out of Ten Mile Creek!

     

    Thank you,

     

    [Your signature]

     

  • 10/24/2014 1:06 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    If you have any new or action alerts that you would like to have posted, please email the details to mnps@chesapeake.net

  • 10/26/2013 7:21 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)
    Tuesday, October 29, 7 PM. Charles County Comprehensive Plan: Sign-up to speak begins as 5:30 PM. The resulting draft Comp. Plan before the BOCC is a disaster. The state has made negative comments of unprecedented number and intensity. You can find links to these comments at www.savecharlescounty.com, the website of SGACC. You can also help spread word by liking and following SGACC on Facebook. The present draft acknowledges no desire for conservation in nearly the entire county, and it kills Mattawoman Creek.

    DNR Proposed Wildlands 

    Details can be found on Maryland DNR Website
    Frederick County: Monday, October 28 at 6 p.m.
    Calvert County: Tuesday, October 29 at 6 p.m.
    Worcester County: Tuesday, October 29 at 7 p.m.
    Montgomery County: Wednesday, October 30 at 6:30 p.m.
    Charles County: Monday, November 4 at 6 p.m.
    Garrett County: Wednesday, November 6 at 6 p.m.
    Somerset County: Wednesday, November 6 at 6 p.m.
    Allegany County: Thursday, November 7 at 6 p.m.
    Baltimore County: Thursday, November 7 at 6:30 p.m.

  • 07/21/2013 9:42 PM | Anonymous
    County Council to cast votes on tree bills on July 23rd

    Please contact the Council TODAY with a final note to speak up for the trees.  Tell them trees matter in our neighborhoods!
     
    The 9-member County Council will cast their votes on the urban tree canopy bill (Bill 35-12) and the Streets and Roadside Trees Bill (Bill 41-12) on Tuesday, July 23rd.  At least 5 Council Members must vote in favor of the bills in order for them to become law. Your voice is important!
     
    Please call the Council at 240-777-7900 and write the entire Council at County.Council@Montgomerycountymd.gov. Email sent to that address will go to all 9 Council members.  Or write them via snail-mail at 100 Maryland Avenue, Rockville, MD 20850.  Ask for YES votes on both tree bills so that tree canopy lost can be protected or replaced.
  • 03/04/2012 3:06 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)
    MNPS received an undated copy of a letter from that the Army Corps of Engineers has determined that the proposed Cross County Connector (in Charles County) -- the CCC -- does not comply with Corps regulations.
    Brief summary of the ACE's evaluation of the CCC:
    • Proposed project would have a direct adverse impact on non-tidal forested wetlands; stream channels and waterways; fish and wildlife; and water quality
    • There are potential practicable alternatives, such as utilizing existing roads
    • May result in substantial cumulative adverse impacts to Mattawoman Creek
    • The proposal has been determined to be contrary to the public interest
  • 10/12/2011 9:07 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Action Alert!

    Open House: Charles County Comprehensive Plan

    Wednesday    October 19   5 pm – 8 pm

    County presentation at 7 PM
    La Plata High School
    6035 Radio Station Road

    Don’t Miss It!!
    This is your chance to voice support for Scenario 1,the land-use scenario that: 
    * Creates a foundation for sustainable development
    * Protects Mattawoman Creek’s declining health
    * Ensures the economic vitality of the County
    * Is the better choice for Charles County
     
    For More Information:
    jp.long@earthlink.net

  • 03/21/2011 12:08 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Volunteers are needed to observe local pollinators of spring beauty (Claytonia virginica and Claytonia caroliniana). If you are interested in observing and learning about the pollinators of these native plants visit http://springbeauties.wordpress.com. To volunteer, please email Alison Parker at spring.beauty.pollinators@gmail.com with your name and location. They will get in touch with you soon with more information!

    This project aims to document changing pollinator populations - by monitoring the insects that visit spring beauty throughout the eastern US, we can determine how pollinator communities change depending on the year, the location, and the season.  This information will help us better understand the biology of native pollinators, as well as help us determine the best way to evaluate their value for native plant reproduction. At the same time, you will learn more about the native bees and flies visiting our early spring flora, and spend some time outdoors during the lovely spring weather.
     
    To help, you need to be able to get to a patch of our study plants, Claytonia virginica and Claytonia caroliniana, which are easily found throughout the Eastern US and southeastern Ontario. We’ll help you learn to distinguish the plants and pollinators, and assist you with questions along the way. We ask for about 2 hours of observations over the course of three weeks, all during sunny weather. As you observe, you’ll fill out data sheets (which we will provide), which you will then mail or email to us along with any comments or concerns. 


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